GREAT BASIN EXTERIORS // A PHOTOGRAPHIC SURVEY

Examining loss, change, and abandonment in the American West
through the lenses of three photographers.

Adam Jahiel, The Escapee Daniel Cheek, Pony Express Nolan Preece, Bottle House Adam Jahiel, Branding Daniel Cheek, Fort Churchill Nolan Preece, Granary Wall Adam Jahiel, Horse Shadows Daniel Cheek, Premium Gas Nolan Preece, Enola Hangar

ABOUT THE EXHIBIT

The Great Basin, the vast, arid region between California's Sierra Nevada Mountains and Utah's Wasatch Range, encompasses the state of Nevada and parts of Idaho, Oregon, and Wyoming.

Great Basin Exteriors: A Photographic Survey examines loss, change, and abandonment in the American West through the lenses of three photographers: Daniel Cheek, Adam Jahiel, and Nolan Preece. Each photographer focuses on subjects that are changing in or disappearing from the Great Basin.

This exhibit, organized by the Nevada Arts Council, is part of the Nevada Touring Initiative – Traveling Exhibition Program, and is funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, Nevada State Legislature and Western States Arts Federation. The Nevada Arts Council is a division of the Department of Tourism and Cultural Affairs.

This site is your online interpretation center and companion to the traveling exhibition of Great Basin Exteriors: A Photographic Survey. We invite you to join the conversation and share your thoughts, reflections, and feelings on the evocative images presented here.

GET STARTED

To view the images, please click on one of the artist's galleries at upper left. From there, feel free to share this site through social media and comment in our discussion area.

Great Basin Exteriors // A Photographic Survey
Exhibit Venues & Dates

  • Truckee Meadows Community College – Artown 2010 (premier), Reno, NV
    July – Aug. 2010
  • Northeastern Nevada Museum, Elko, NV
    Sept. 1 – Oct. 27, 2010
  • Fernley City Hall, Fernley, NV
    Nov. 4 – Dec. 30, 2011
  • Pershing County Library, Lovelock, NV
    Jan. 7 – March 4, 2011
  • Eureka Courthouse Gallery, Eureka, NV
    March 14 – May 9, 2011
  • Historic 5th Street School, Las Vegas, NV
    May 17 – July 12, 2011
  • Marjorie Barrick Museum, Las Vegas, NV
    July 20 – Sept. 14, 2011
  • Sierra Nevada College Library, Incline Village, NV
    Sept. 22 – Nov. 17, 2011
  • Western Nevada College, Fallon, NV
    Nov. 25 – Jan. 20, 2012
  • Humboldt County Library, Winnemucca, NV
    Jan. 30 – March 26, 2012
  • Lake Tahoe Community College, The Haldan Art Gallery, South Lake Tahoe, CA
    April 12 – June 15, 2012
  • St. George Art Museum, St. George, UT
    June 20 – Sept. 8, 2012
Our Sponsors

SPONSORS

Great Basin Exteriors: A Photographic Survey is part of the Nevada Arts Council's Nevada Touring Initiative's Traveling Exhibition Program. Support for the exhibit, catalogue and this website has been provided by the Western States Arts Federation and the National Endowment for the Arts. The Nevada Arts Council is a division of the Nevada State Department of Tourism and Cultural Affairs.

Special thanks to the Darrell Armuth and Donna Hellwinkel Collection for the loan of their Adam Jahiel platinum prints for this exhibition.

RESOURCES

Great Basin Exteriors: A Photographic Survey is part of the Nevada Arts Council's Nevada Touring Initiative's Traveling Exhibition Program (TEP).

Designed to provide high-quality visual arts exhibits to communities throughout Nevada for an affordable fee, TEP features an array of subjects and art forms, ranging from traditional Washoe basketry to landscape painting and contemporary sculpture. TEP sponsors receive installation and pick-up, insurance, publicity materials and Gallery Notes for each exhibit. Download the Gallery Notes for Great Basin Exteriors: A Photographic Survey.

A catalogue for Great Basin Exteriors: A Photographic Survey is available for $15; please call the Nevada Arts Council at 775.687.6680. This 60-page full-color deluxe publication presents the work of photographers Adam Jahiel, Daniel Cheek and Nolan Preece. The catalogue also includes an insightful essay by noted art critic, Kirk Robertson.